Last edited by Faele
Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of The Pro-slavery argument found in the catalog.

The Pro-slavery argument

The Pro-slavery argument

  • 186 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Walker, Richards in Charleston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery -- United States -- Controversial literature -- 1852,
  • Slavery -- Justification

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesSelected Americana from Sabin"s Dictionary of books relating to America, from its discovery to the present time -- 65737
    ContributionsHammond, James Henry, 1807-1864., Harper, William, 1790-1847., Simms, William Gilmore, 1806-1870., Dew, Thomas R. 1802-1846.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination490 p
    Number of Pages490
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14992394M

    The Pro-Slavery Argument | This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series. In the interest of creating a more extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark . Pro Slavery argument regarding the slaves' role in society. Mudsill Theory. A video clip promoting online viewing of a book discussion program. September 3,

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Pro-Slavery Argument: As Maintained by the Most Distinguished Writers of the Southern States (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! The Pro-Slavery Argument () You can find similar works online. You can read that book in its entirety on Google Books. It's a compilation of 4 different authors who were a professor named Thomas Roderick Dew, and politicians William Harper and James Hammond, and William Gilmore Simms, a famous author in his day.

      Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The Pro-slavery Argument, as Maintained by the Most Distinguished Writers of the Southern States by, , Walker, Richards & Co. edition.   This, incidentally, is the pro-slavery argument that Harriet Beecher Stowe destroys in Uncle Tom's Cabin. There was also an economic defense: slavery was profitable. There was also an economic.


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The Pro-slavery argument Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Pro-slavery Argument: As Maintained By The Most Distinguished Writers Of The Southern States [Harper, William, James Henry Hammond, William Gilmore Simms] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Pro-slavery Argument: As Maintained By The Most Distinguished Writers Of The Southern States Cited by: 9. Pro Slavery Argument from Cannibals All. Book Excerpt. Background Notes. Cannibals All. by George Fitzhugh () was published inThe Pro-slavery argument book same year as the Dred Scott Supreme Court decision.

The book owes both its title and much of its intellectual foundation to the British social critic and historian Thomas Carlyle. The book’s central.

“Southern pro-slavery theorists asserted that slavery eliminated this problem by elevating all free people to the status of “citizen”, and removing the landless poor (the “mudsill”) from the political process entirely by means of enslavement” (“The Pro-slavery Argument”).

Through the argument of pro-slavery confederate states in the lower south where underdeveloped compared to the north and upper south in terms of modernization of industry.

Both the north and south during the ’s began to drift in their source of profits and for that reason the question of slavery arise. The Pro-Slavery Argument, as Maintained by the Most Distinguished Writers of the Southern States by Harper, WilliamHammond, James Henry and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   In the book Fitzhugh unapologetically acknowledges that the South is a slave society, but he claims that the North is, too.

The word “boast” would probably go a long way in winning over Fitzhugh’s pro-slavery readers. Here, they might think, is one of us — unapologetic, unashamed, confident.

A Pro-Slavery Argument, /5(2). Another pro-slavery argument was that slavery was a natural state of mankind since it has existed throughout history. The southern states to this day are the agricultural surplus for all of the United States crop production.

For centuries, slaves were the most efficient and cheapest way to produce and harvest crops. A Favorite Pro-Slavery Argument Blog entry posted on December 7, by JD Thomas “ Slaves are better fed, clothed and treated, and more kindly cared for in old age, than the majority of Northern laborers.

George Fitzhugh was a slaveholder, a prominent pro-slavery Democrat, and sociological theorist who advanced the argument for slavery as a social-welfare plantation structure that would provide blacks with better care than the free labor in the North.

He took the positive-good argument to its final extreme conclusion. The pro-slavery supporters used the bible to suggest that the Slave Trade was tolerated and approved of by God in the days of Abraham.

In a book by an unknown author - The Negro and the Free Born Briton compared; or a vindication of the African slave trade - the author argued that slavery was lawful from a religious, political and. Pro-Slavery The main issue in America politics during the years of the late 's to the late 's was rners wanted to keep the tradition of slave labor alive, and were justifying slavery in any way possible; issue of slavery was a continuing debate in the ’s.

James Henry Hammond, John C. Calhoun, and William Joseph Harper were some of. What Tise does is trace the origins of the pro-slavery defense or "positive good" argument back to its origins among New England clergy and other northern thinkers and writers.

His volume, at just over five hundred pages, is not easy reading, but he deals with an important subject, has an original thesis, and proves many of his by: The Pro-slavery argument: as maintained by the most distinguished writers of the southern states: Containing the several essays on the subject, of Chancellor Harper, Governor Hammond, Dr.

Simms, and Professor Dew: Authors: William Harper, Thomas Roderick Dew, James Henry Hammond, William Gilmore Simms: Publisher: Lippincott, Grambo, & co.,   The pro-slavery argument, as maintained by the most distinguished writers of the southern states: containing the several essays on the subject, of Chancellor Harper, Governor Hammond, Dr.

Simms, and Professor Dew Item PreviewPages: Pro-slavery Argument. What was the third of the 3 pro-slavery arguments. slaves live better than the poor in the north. what divided the north from the south. what book caused issues between the north and south and who wrote it.

Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet beecher stowe. Slavery was at its peak both economically and controversially during the 19th century.

The proslavery forces of the south proposed many arguments to defend their institution that they held dear. Legal, religion, and economic arguments were all used to 5/5(2). He discusses the internal slave trade that moved thousands of slaves from the eastern seaboard to the cotton states of the Southwest between and Professor Blight then sketches the contents of the pro-slavery argument, including its biblical, historical, economic, cynical, and utopian aspects.

A Pro-Slavery Argument, – A Close Reading Guide from America in Class 4 the gains of his employer. To treat free laborers badly and unfairly, is universally inculcated as a moral duty, and the selfishness of man’s nature prompts him to the File Size: KB.

Cotton Is King, and Pro-Slavery Arguments: Comprising the Writings of Hammond, Harper, Christy, Stringfellow, Hodge, Bledsoe, and Cartwright, on This (Hardback or Cased Book) Bledsoe, Albert Taylor Published by Andesite Press 8/11/ ().

Pro-slavery was an ideology that promoted the practice of slavery and defended against any interference with the system. By the s, slavery was practiced mainly in the Southern United States. African American slaves were considered owners justified them being property because slaves were black—in other words not people.

Slaves were used on large. The Pro-slavery Argument: As Maintained by the Most Distinguished Writers of the Southern States. Lippincott, Grambo, & Company, - Slavery - pages. 0 Reviews. Preview this book.TEXT OF THE PRO-SLAVERY ARGUMENT (, by Thomas Dew)Thomas Roderick Dew (–) was an economist, professor of law, and president of the College of William and Mary.

His influential Pro-Slavery Argument offers theological, historical, and political evidence in a point-by-point refutation of the anti-slavery arguments of his day. Source for information on .Cotton is King, and Pro-Slavery Arguments is a collection of essays and speeches from the antebellum American South, making philosophical, economic, anthropological, and theological arguments in favor of slavery.

It provides a fascinating view into the minds of slave owners on the precipice of the American Civil War/5(5).